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Full Listing
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Descriptions
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Specialized Arrows
The Crossbow

Arrows: An arrow used as a melee weapon is treated as a light improvised weapon (–4 penalty on attack rolls) and deals damage as a dagger of its size (critical multiplier x2). Arrows come in a leather quiver that holds 20 arrows. An arrow that hits its target is destroyed; one that misses has a 50% chance of being destroyed or lost.

Axe, Crushing: A crushing axe is a double weapon, consisting of strong shaft, with a heavy battle axe blade at one end, and a heavy mace head at the other. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do so, you incur all of the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons: a one-handed weapon and a light weapon.. A creature using a double weapon in one hand, such as an ogre using a crushing axe, can't use it as a double weapon.

Axe, Orc Double: An orc double axe is a double weapon. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, just as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon.

A creature wielding an orc double axe in one hand can’t use it as a double weapon—only one end of the weapon can be used in any given round.

Axe, Spiked Throwing:  A spiked throwing axe is balanced for throwing.  It can be used as a melee weapon as well as for throwing.  The spiked throwing axe has a serrated edge that has a higher critical range.

Barbed Needle, Blowgun:  These darts are often used for hunting small animals.  The recursive barbs on these darts tend to stick into their targets and are hard to remove.  Creatures with a Natural Armor bonus of +3 or greater are immune to barbed darts.

Bec-de-Corbin:  This weapon takes the form of a small polearm with a combined hammer and pick at its head. Swung with great force, the wielder is able to concentrate all the energy of his blows into the sharp pick end of the weapon, enabling him to cause a great deal of damage against the most heavily armored of enemies, and is thus commonly found in the hands of any fighter looking to battle metal-clad knights. The bec-de-corbin may be used as a piercing weapon with its pick head, or a bludgeoning weapon with its hammer. However, it may not be used as both within the same combat round.

Bladed Boots: These boots feature a retractable broad steel blade in each sole, and heel-click mechanism to spring the blade. Your opponent cannot use a disarm action to disarm you of bladed boots. An attack with a bladed boot is considered an armed attack. The cost and weight given is for a pair of bladed boots. You can use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to attack rolls with a bladed boot.

Blowgun:  A medium or larger character can use a regular blowgun in one hand at a -4 penalty.  This blowgun averages 4 feet in length of hollow wood.  Small characters must use two hands to use this weapon.

Blowgun, Large:    The large blowgun is a hollow piece of wood averaging 6 feet in length.  A large blowgun requires two hands to use, regardless of the user's size.  Loading a blowgun is a ready action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

Blowgun, Tiny:  This exotic weapon is common among rogues and others who favor stealth over power.  A tiny blowgun is a hollow piece of wood less than 2 feet in length.  A small or larger character can use a tiny blowgun in one hand.

Bolas: You can use this weapon to make a ranged trip attack against an opponent. You can’t be tripped during your own trip attempt when using a set of bolas.

Bolts: A crossbow bolt used as a melee weapon is treated as a light improvised weapon (–4 penalty on attack rolls) and deals damage as a dagger of its size (crit x2). Bolts come in a wooden case that holds 10 bolts (or 5, for a repeating crossbow). A bolt that hits its target is destroyed; one that misses has a 50% chance of being destroyed or lost.

Bullets, Sling: Bullets come in a leather pouch that holds 10 bullets. A bullet that hits its target is destroyed; one that misses has a 50% chance of being destroyed or lost.

Bullets, Glass, Sling:  Glass bullets are crudely blown glass balls.  They come in a heavy leather pouch that contains 10 bullets.  A glass bullet that hits its target shatters and sends shards of razor sharp shrapnel flying into the flesh of its target.  Bullets that miss their target are destroyed and unusable.  Creatures with a Natural Armor bonus of +3 or greater suffer only 1 point of damage from the glass sling bullets.

Chain, Spiked: A spiked chain has reach, so you can strike opponents 10 feet away with it. In addition, unlike most other weapons with reach, it can be used against an adjacent foe.

You can make trip attacks with the chain. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the chain to avoid being tripped.

When using a spiked chain, you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an opponent (including the roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

You can use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to attack rolls with a spiked chain sized for you, even though it isn’t a light weapon for you.

Cleaver:  This is the basic meat cleaver available in most city homes.

Club, padded: An ideal weapon for the rogue who needs to take someone alive, the padded club is a stout, oaken cudgel wrapped with a thick, woolen covering. The padded club deals subdual rather than standard damage.

Crossbow, Hand: You can draw a hand crossbow back by hand. Loading a hand crossbow is a move action that provokes attacks of opportunity.

You can shoot, but not load, a hand crossbow with one hand at no penalty. You can shoot a hand crossbow with each hand, but you take a penalty on attack rolls as if attacking with two light weapons.

Crossbow, Heavy: You draw a heavy crossbow back by turning a small winch. Loading a heavy crossbow is a full-round action that provokes attacks of opportunity.

Normally, operating a heavy crossbow requires two hands. However, you can shoot, but not load, a heavy crossbow with one hand at a –4 penalty on attack rolls. You can shoot a heavy crossbow with each hand, but you take a penalty on attack rolls as if attacking with two one-handed weapons. This penalty is cumulative with the penalty for one-handed firing.

Crossbow, Light: You draw a light crossbow back by pulling a lever. Loading a light crossbow is a move action that provokes attacks of opportunity.

Normally, operating a light crossbow requires two hands. However, you can shoot, but not load, a light crossbow with one hand at a –2 penalty on attack rolls. You can shoot a light crossbow with each hand, but you take a penalty on attack rolls as if attacking with two light weapons. This penalty is cumulative with the penalty for one-handed firing.

Crossbow, Repeating: The repeating crossbow (whether heavy or light) holds 5 crossbow bolts. As long as it holds bolts, you can reload it by pulling the reloading lever (a free action). Loading a new case of 5 bolts is a full-round action that provokes attacks of opportunity.

You can fire a repeating crossbow with one hand or fire a repeating crossbow in each hand in the same manner as you would a normal crossbow of the same size. However, you must fire the weapon with two hands in order to use the reloading lever, and you must use two hands to load a new case of bolts.

Dagger: You get a +2 bonus on Sleight of Hand checks made to conceal a dagger on your body (see the Sleight of Hand skill).

Dagger, Ribbon:  Ribbon daggers consist of a small, .at blade and a series of ribbons or strings for the handle. The user spins the weapon much like a sling. The benefit of these weapons is in concealment. Because the blade is so small, it can be placed on or in clothing, leaving only brightly colored ribbons showing. This weapon is used mostly by entertainers who want a little extra protection.

Dagger, Ritual: This prop dagger has a decent steel blade, but an insane mess for a hilt. The hilt often looks like some fanciful subject imagined by its creator, such as a dragon or animal’s paw. These daggers look impressive (and give the user a +2 circumstance bonus to Bluff and Intimidate skill checks in a ritual) but are really nothing more than props. Using one in combat carries a –1 penalty to attack and damage rolls.

Dorje: This short scepter is representative of both the divine wrath that smites the wicked and the indestructible power of faith. Used in conjunction with a bell, it serves to balance the feminine energies of the hymn with more masculine forces. A dorje is often made from ivory or jade, with precious metal inlays and gems set into the tips.

Falx: A wholly unsophisticated weapon, the falx consists of a slightly-curved blade mounted atop a two-foot shaft. It is a heavy sword and, whilst it does not require much skill to use, the wounds it deals are usually severe.

Fan, Bladed: The elegant bladed fan remains a rare weapon, save for its use among a handful of courtesans, and female assassins and duelists. While these weapons appear to be ornate, attractive, folding ribbed fans, they are also useful weapons. The ribs of the fan are inevitably constructed of metal, the tip of each rib sharpened, allowing it to be used as a slashing weapon, and the "fabric" of the fan itself is commonly made of fine silk, heavily decorated. You can use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to attack rolls with a bladed fan.

Flail, Dire: A dire flail is a double weapon. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, just as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. A creature wielding a dire flail in one hand can’t use it as a double weapon— only one end of the weapon can be used in any given round.

When using a dire flail, you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an enemy (including the opposed attack roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

You can also use this weapon to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the dire flail to avoid being tripped.

Flail or Heavy Flail: With a flail, you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an enemy (including the roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

You can also use this weapon to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the flail to avoid being tripped.

Flail, Sprinkling: The head of this .ail is hollowed out, with several small apertures. It is essentially the warlike application of a priestly censer, the hollow designed to contain holy water that is sprinkled about as the wielder swings it. The holy water inside deals 1d4 extra damage to undead and evil outsiders. The reservoir inside the weapon can contain enough holy water for six attacks, whether they are successful or not.

Flamberge: The flamberge is a huge sword, born from legend, and many fighters are keen to wield one when seeking to gain a reputation for themselves. Forged with a waved blade, the design greatly increases the surface area available for swings, allowing a fighter to cut through his opponent’s defenses with ease and cause crippling damage. It is, however, also difficult to construct and therefore expensive.

Gauntlet: This metal glove lets you deal lethal damage rather than nonlethal damage with unarmed strikes. A strike with a gauntlet is otherwise considered an unarmed attack. The cost and weight given are for a single gauntlet. Medium and heavy armors (except breastplate) come with gauntlets.

Gauntlet, Battle: The battle gauntlet is a thick, heavy, oversized metal gauntlet, heavily padded inside, and reinforced with large studs on the knuckles. In addition to providing a handy striking implement, adding weight and protection to the user's blow, it is also large and sturdy enough to effectively function as a buckler (+1 Armor Bonus, -1 Armor Check Penalty, 5% Arcane Spell Failure). Someone wearing a battle gauntlet can still hold and use a weapon, but the extra weight on the arm inflicts a -1 penalty on attack rolls, and negates the battle gauntlet's use as a buckler for the rest of the round. This penalty stacks with those for fighting with an off hand weapon, or two weapons, if appropriate. Your opponent cannot use a disarm action to disarm you of a battle gauntlet. An attack with a battle gauntlet is considered an armed attack. The cost and weight given is for a single gauntlet.

Gauntlet, Bladed: Blades are placed along the back of the gauntlet to allow the character to slash an opponent with a backhanded swipe. An opponent cannot use a disarm action to disarm a character’s bladed gauntlets. The cost and weight given are for a single gauntlet. An attack with a bladed gauntlet is considered an armed attack.

Gauntlets, Clawed: These armored gloves end in long, sharpened spikes designed to aid in climbing. When used in conjunction with a Climb check, the gauntlets grant a +1 circumstance bonus. In addition, when sharpened the spikes’ edges make effective slashing weapons.

Gauntlet, Spiked: Your opponent cannot use a disarm action to disarm you of spiked gauntlets. The cost and weight given are for a single gauntlet. An attack with a spiked gauntlet is considered an armed attack.

Gladius: Looking much like an ornate short sword, the gladius is actually a very different weapon. With a blade expertly-honed to the keenest point, the gladius is exceptionally well-balanced and utterly lethal in skilled hands. As well as a better threat range than a short sword, the gladius in all respects counts as being masterwork.

Glaive: A glaive has reach. You can strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but you can’t use it against an adjacent foe.

Gold Coin Spade: A gold coin spade is a long-handled weapon with a circle of steel on one end, often with an elaborate design, usually of a clan or religious symbol, set in the centre of the wheel. In addition to delivering powerful, slashing blows, the wheel is especially suited to trapping opponents’ weapons - the gold coin spade can be used by anyone proficient with martial weapons but those who possess Exotic Weapon Proficiency (gold coin spade) gain a +2 bonus to all Disarm checks.

Greathammer: A large and brutal weapon designed for those who wish no subtlety in their fighting, the great hammer is a double-headed mallet, with one side ending in a tapered point. The wielder may choose the type of damage he will inflict, being either a piercing or bludgeoning weapon on demand.

Guisarme: A guisarme has reach. You can strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but you can’t use it against an adjacent foe.

You can also use it to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the guisarme to avoid being tripped.

Gypsy’s Net: Both a weapon and an article of clothing, a gypsy’s net is woven from fine wool, incorporates delicate bells and is laced with threads of braided steel. These nets, commonly worn as skirts or kilts, also come with a removable chain hem edged in tiny hooks and blades. To use a gypsy’s net, the wearer must possess both a rank of Perform (net dancing) and the Exotic Weapon Proficiency (net) feat. The whirling, acrobatic fighting style of a gypsy net wielder is impressive to behold, counting as the performance needed to use bardic music. A special maneuver is available to users of the gypsy’s net. During any rounds spent folding the net to be cast again, the hem of blades and hooks allows the wielder to make slashing attacks for 1d4 damage. This type of attack does not interfere with folding the net, which occurs at the same time. In all other ways, a gypsy’s net acts as a net when used in combat.

Halberd: If you use a ready action to set a halberd against a charge, you deal double damage on a successful hit against a charging character.

You can use a halberd to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the halberd to avoid being tripped.

Hammer, Gnome Hooked: A gnome hooked hammer is a double weapon. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, just as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. The hammer’s blunt head is a bludgeoning weapon that deals 1d6 points of damage (crit x3). Its hook is a piercing weapon that deals 1d4 points of damage (crit x4). You can use either head as the primary weapon. The other head is the offhand weapon. A creature wielding a gnome hooked hammer in one hand can’t use it as a double weapon—only one end of the weapon can be used in any given round.

You can use a gnome hooked hammer to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the gnome hooked hammer to avoid being tripped.

Gnomes treat gnome hooked hammers as martial weapons.

Hammer, Meteor:  A meteor hammer is simply a solid, metal ball attached to a 15-foot length of rope. The wielder attacks by quickly shooting the metal ball out with a punch or kick and then pulling it back in one smooth motion, powering his strikes by coiling the rope around his elbows, neck, back, legs and arms. A character wielding a meteor hammer threatens a radius of 10 feet and can attack freely anywhere within that radius. In addition, a monk can use his more favorable number of attacks and flurry of blows ability. However, using the meteor hammer requires full concentration – the wielder can only attack using the full attack action, limiting his movement to a 5 foot step in any round he wishes to attack. Also, since a meteor hammer attacks with linear, rather than circular blows, it cannot be used in conjunction with trip attempts. A meteor hammer can benefit from the Weapon Finesse feat.

Iron Staff: An iron staff is a heavier version of a normal quarterstaff, much sturdier and capable of inflicting large amounts of damage with quick, successive hits. An iron staff can be wielded by anyone proficient with quarterstaff and can be used as a double weapon.

Javelin: Since it is not designed for melee, you are treated as nonproficient with it and take a –4 penalty on attack rolls if you use a javelin as a melee weapon.

Kama: The kama is a special monk weapon. This designation gives a monk wielding a kama special options.

You can use a kama to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the kama to avoid being tripped.

Kartika: This elaborately decorated, ceremonial knife has a wide, crescent-shaped blade that is mounted perpendicular to the handle. The knife is used to represent the severing of physical bonds and mortal connections; most often a kartika’s presence in a ritual is to spill a small amount of the cleric’s blood to serve as a focus for the congregation.

Lance: A lance deals double damage when used from the back of a charging mount. It has reach, so you can strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but you can’t use it against an adjacent foe.

While mounted, you can wield a lance with one hand.

Longbow: You need at least two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size. A longbow is too unwieldy to use while you are mounted. If you have a penalty for low Strength, apply it to damage rolls when you use a longbow. If you have a bonus for high Strength, you can apply it to damage rolls when you use a composite longbow (see below) but not a regular longbow.

Longbow, Composite: You need at least two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size. You can use a composite longbow while mounted. All composite bows are made with a particular strength rating (that is, each requires a minimum Strength modifier to use with proficiency). If your Strength bonus is less than the strength rating of the composite bow, you can’t effectively use it, so you take a –2 penalty on attacks with it. The default composite longbow requires a Strength modifier of +0 or higher to use with proficiency. A composite longbow can be made with a high strength rating to take advantage of an above-average Strength score; this feature allows you to add your Strength bonus to damage, up to the maximum bonus indicated for the bow. Each point of Strength bonus granted by the bow adds 100 gp to its cost.

For purposes of weapon proficiency and similar feats, a composite longbow is treated as if it were a longbow.

Longspear: A longspear has reach. You can strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but you can’t use it against an adjacent foe. If you use a ready action to set a longspear against a charge, you deal double damage on a successful hit against a charging character.

Longspear, half-moon:  An adaptation of the longspear, the half-moon shaped blade of this weapon makes it ideal for dismounting attackers. Any rider hit by a halfmoon longspear must make a Ride check at DC 10 + base attack bonus of attacker, or be dismounted.

Mace, Dire:  This large mace is made of metal, even the haft.  Because of its oversized construction, this is considered a martial weapon.

Needle, Blowgun:  These needles are often used to hone the skill of people just learning the blowgun.  Experienced users of a blowgun can coat these needles with poison or drugs to affect their victims.  Creatures with a Natural Armor bonus of +1 or greater are immune to needle darts.

Net: A net is used to entangle enemies. When you throw a net, you make a ranged touch attack against your target. A net’s maximum range is 10 feet. If you hit, the target is entangled. An entangled creature takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls and a –4 penalty on Dexterity, can move at only half speed, and cannot charge or run. If you control the trailing rope by succeeding on an opposed Strength check while holding it, the entangled creature can move only within the limits that the rope allows. If the entangled creature attempts to cast a spell, it must make a DC 15 Concentration check or be unable to cast the spell.

An entangled creature can escape with a DC 20 Escape Artist check (a full-round action). The net has 5 hit points and can be burst with a DC 25 Strength check (also a full-round action).

A net is useful only against creatures within one size category of you.

A net must be folded to be thrown effectively. The first time you throw your net in a fight, you make a normal ranged touch attack roll. After the net is unfolded, you take a –4 penalty on attack rolls with it. It takes 2 rounds for a proficient user to fold a net and twice that long for a nonproficient one to do so.

Net, Handled: A fine, mesh netting mounted on a wooden hoop set with a long handle, this net is designed to capture tiny creatures such as butterflies, rats and other pests whose organs may be harvested for material components. The handled net works similar to a normal, thrown net. It may only be used against creatures of Fine or Diminutive size. Using the net is a melee touch attack. On a hit, the target is entangled and suffers –2 on attacks and a –4 penalty to its effective Dexterity. The creature is trapped within the net and may not move. To escape, the trapped creature must make an Escape Artist check (DC 20) as a full-round action or tear through the mesh netting (5 hit points; Break DC 20) to escape. While trapped within the net, a creature must make a Concentration check (DC 15) to cast any spells.

Nunchaku: The nunchaku is a special monk weapon. This designation gives a monk wielding a nunchaku special options. With a nunchaku, you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an enemy (including the roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

Quarterstaff: A quarterstaff is a double weapon. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, just as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. A creature wielding a quarterstaff in one hand can’t use it as a double weapon—only one end of the weapon can be used in any given round.

The quarterstaff is a special monk weapon. This designation gives a monk wielding a quarterstaff special options.

Parasol: Used by circus performers as a balance aid, parasols are surprisingly effective in this role. Small umbrellas weighted around their edges to provide a counterweight, parasols are often made of resistant materials that can function admirably as small shields. While they do occupy one hand, parasols add a +2 circumstance bonus to Balance checks. When folded up, a parasol can be used as a simple weapon.

Pike:  A pike has reach.  You can strike opponents 15 feet away.  The Pike, unlike other reach weapons can also strike opponents closer.  The Pike can be used effectively against opponents who are 10 feet away also, but it can't be used against adjacent opponents.

Pilum: The pilum is a highly sophisticated spear, following a design intended to cripple an enemy’s ability to fight effectively. The shaft of the pilum has a locking pin two thirds of the way along its length, designed to snap upon impact and so denying an enemy the chance to throw the weapon back at the wielder in battle. A pilum, once thrown or upon striking a target, may not be used again until the locking pin has been replaced (additional pins cost 1sp each). In addition, pilums are often thrown at an enemy’s shield with the aim of it becoming wedged and making the shield useless in a subsequent melee. Upon any successful attack with a pilum, a character may choose to cause no damage but instead cause his target to lose any shield bonus to his Armor Class. It takes a full-round action to remove the pilum and make the shield useable once more.

Pit Talons: These savage weapons consist of three 12" long, dagger-like slashing blades, attached to the top of a sturdy leather gauntlet so that the blades protrude beyond the wearer's knuckles. Your opponent cannot use a disarm action to disarm you of pit talons. The cost and weight given is for a single pit talon.

Ranseur: A ranseur has reach. You can strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but you can’t use it against an adjacent foe.

With a ranseur, you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an opponent (including the roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

Rapier: You can use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to attack rolls with a rapier sized for you, even though it isn’t a light weapon for you. You can’t wield a rapier in two hands in order to apply 1-1/2 times your Strength bonus to damage.

Saber:  The curved blade of this weapon makes the weapon's edge effectively keener.  You can use the weapon finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to attack rolls with a saber.  The Saber has a covered hilt that can be used as a gauntlet when striking an opponent.

Sai: With a sai, you get a +4 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an enemy (including the roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

The sai is a special monk weapon. This designation gives a monk wielding a sai special options.

Scythe: A scythe can be used to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the scythe to avoid being tripped.

Shield, Heavy or Light: You can bash with a shield instead of using it for defense. See Armor for details.

Shortbow: You need at least two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size. You can use a shortbow while mounted. If you have a penalty for low Strength, apply it to damage rolls when you use a shortbow. If you have a bonus for high Strength, you can apply it to damage rolls when you use a composite shortbow (see below) but not a regular shortbow.

Shortbow, Composite: You need at least two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size. You can use a composite shortbow while mounted. All composite bows are made with a particular strength rating (that is, each requires a minimum Strength modifier to use with proficiency). If your Strength bonus is lower than the strength rating of the composite bow, you can’t effectively use it, so you take a –2 penalty on attacks with it. The default composite shortbow requires a Strength modifier of +0 or higher to use with proficiency. A composite shortbow can be made with a high strength rating to take advantage of an above-average Strength score; this feature allows you to add your Strength bonus to damage, up to the maximum bonus indicated for the bow. Each point of Strength bonus granted by the bow adds 75 gp to its cost.

For purposes of weapon proficiency and similar feats, a composite shortbow is treated as if it were a shortbow.

Shortspear: A shortspear is small enough to wield one-handed. It may also be thrown.

Shuriken: A shuriken is a special monk weapon. This designation gives a monk wielding shuriken special options. A shuriken can’t be used as a melee weapon.

Although they are thrown weapons, shuriken are treated as ammunition for the purposes of drawing them, crafting masterwork or otherwise special versions of them and what happens to them after they are thrown.

Siangham: The siangham is a special monk weapon. This designation gives a monk wielding a siangham special options.

Sickle: A sickle can be used to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the sickle to avoid being tripped.

Sling: Your Strength modifier applies to damage rolls when you use a sling, just as it does for thrown weapons. You can fire, but not load, a sling with one hand. Loading a sling is a move action that requires two hands and provokes attacks of opportunity.

You can hurl ordinary stones with a sling, but stones are not as dense or as round as bullets. Thus, such an attack deals damage as if the weapon were designed for a creature one size category smaller than you and you take a –1 penalty on attack rolls.

Sling Staff:  The staff sling consists of a short wooden staff with a leather sling attached to one end.  It can be used to throw larger and heavier projectiles than normal slings.  A staff sling can also be used as a melee weapon.

The staff sling can be constructed using a smaller staff for small characters.  It still does the listed damage but weighs one half the listed weight.

Slingshot:  Woodsmen discovered that certain resins combined well with intertwined strings to make a very elastic cord. The slingshot is a Y-shaped wooden stick with this elastic string tied on both arms, with a sling at the centre. This weapon is a good substitute for a normal sling in the restrictive confines of heavily-wooded areas.

Spear: A spear can be thrown. If you use a ready action to set a spear against a charge, you deal double damage on a successful hit against a charging character.

Spear, Bane: The bane spear is a durable shortspear, the butt end of which is set with long, solid, mace flanges that resembles an arrow's fletching, giving the bane spear an appearance remarkably like that of a huge arrow. A bane spear is a double weapon, and can be used to stab like a spear, and bludgeon with the mace flanges. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do so, you incur all of the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons: a one-handed weapon and a light weapon.. A creature using a double weapon in one hand, such as an ogre using a bane spear, can't use it as a double weapon. A bane spear may also be effectively thrown, the mace flanges/fletching acting to stabilize and spin the spear when thrown.

Spear, double:  The double spear is a double weapon.  You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, as if you were wielding a one-handed weapon and a light weapon.  A creature using a double weapon in one hand, such as an ogre using a double spear, can't use it as a double weapon.

Spiked Armor: You can outfit your armor with spikes, which can deal damage in a grapple or as a separate attack. See Armor for details.

Spiked Shield, Heavy or Light: You can bash with a spiked shield instead of using it for defense. See Armor for details.

Strike, Unarmed: A Medium character deals 1d3 points of nonlethal damage with an unarmed strike. A Small character deals 1d2 points of nonlethal damage. A monk or any character with the Improved Unarmed Strike feat can deal lethal or nonlethal damage with unarmed strikes, at her option. The damage from an unarmed strike is considered weapon damage for the purposes of effects that give you a bonus on weapon damage rolls.

An unarmed strike is always considered a light weapon. Therefore, you can use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to attack rolls with an unarmed strike.

Sword, Bastard: A bastard sword is too large to use in one hand without special training; thus, it is an exotic weapon. A character can use a bastard sword two-handed as a martial weapon.

Sword, Broadsword:  The broadsword is the favorite weapon of the peasant.  It is a crude sword with a broad blade and an overweight pommel.  Village blacksmiths can easily craft these weapons and consequently, they have become common for town militias to possess them.

Sword, Gauntlet: Usually seen within gladiatorial arenas, this weapon is a simple combination of a metal gauntlet onto which is attached a carefully-honed longsword blade. Many gladiators gain a strong following amongst the crowds they entertain by wearing one on each arm. The sword-gauntlet feels extremely natural in use, though it severely restricts the use of the hand it is strapped to – all Dexterity-based checks requiring the use of the hand suffer a –4 circumstance penalty. However, the strong fixture of the weapon results in the wielder being completely immune to any attempts to disarm him.

Sword, Two-Bladed: A two-bladed sword is a double weapon. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, just as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. A creature wielding a two-bladed sword in one hand can’t use it as a double weapon—only one end of the weapon can be used in any given round.

Sword, sawtooth: One of the most primitive weapons to be carried into battle, the sawtooth is nothing more than a wooden sword with sharpened teeth or horns mounted along one edge. Useless for thrusting, it is nevertheless capable of dealing serious injury with a solid strike, though it will always be seriously outclassed by metal forged swords.

Sword, war:  Sometimes called a greatscimitar, the curved blade of this weapon makes its edge effectively keener in determining critical threats.  It is a large version of a scimitar, with a wider blade and a heavy pommel to offset the weight.  The warsword is too large to use one handed without special training.  Due to the ability to use the weapon one handed, the warsword is sometimes used instead of the Falchion or Greataxe as a headsmen's blade.  The warsword may be used as a two handed martial weapon.

Throwing Blades:  This weapon resembles a sword with three or four points.  The handle and lower part of the blade appear normal, but the blade forks several times into a number of dagger-like points.  It is thrown horizontally, so that it spins parallel to the ground.

Trident: This weapon can be thrown. If you use a ready action to set a trident against a charge, you deal double damage on a successful hit against a charging character.

Urgrosh, Dwarven: A dwarven urgrosh is a double weapon. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, just as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. The urgrosh’s axe head is a slashing weapon that deals 1d8 points of damage. Its spear head is a piercing weapon that deals 1d6 points of damage. You can use either head as the primary weapon. The other is the off-hand weapon. A creature wielding a dwarven urgrosh in one hand can’t use it as a double weapon—only one end of the weapon can be used in any given round.

If you use a ready action to set an urgrosh against a charge, you deal double damage if you score a hit against a charging character. If you use an urgrosh against a charging character, the spear head is the part of the weapon that deals damage.

Dwarves treat dwarven urgroshes as martial weapons.

War Fork: The war fork is a short polearm with two broad, parallel sword blades affixed to the end. These blades can be used for stabbing, or they can be swung like an axe. If readied against charging opponents, it deals double damage.

War Rake:  Often little more than a commoner’s tool beaten into a weapon of war, the war-rake is sometimes favored by fighters looking for a more esoteric image. Though a few such weapons are actually forged by weaponsmiths, most are simply the sharpened rakes of peasants, mounted with a sharp spike or pick. The war-rake can be used to trip an opponent, but if a character is tripped in return, he need only drop the weapon to avoid being tripped.

Waraxe, Dwarven: A dwarven waraxe is too large to use in one hand without special training; thus, it is an exotic weapon. A Medium character can use a dwarven waraxe two-handed as a martial weapon, or a Large creature can use it one-handed in the same way. A dwarf treats a dwarven waraxe as a martial weapon even when using it in one hand.

Whip: A whip deals nonlethal damage. It deals no damage to any creature with an armor bonus of +1 or higher or a natural armor bonus of +3 or higher. The whip is treated as a melee weapon with 15-foot reach, though you don’t threaten the area into which you can make an attack. In addition, unlike most other weapons with reach, you can use it against foes anywhere within your reach (including adjacent foes).

Using a whip provokes an attack of opportunity, just as if you had used a ranged weapon.

You can make trip attacks with a whip. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the whip to avoid being tripped.

When using a whip, you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an opponent (including the roll to keep from being disarmed if the attack fails).

You can use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to attack rolls with a whip sized for you, even though it isn’t a light weapon for you.

Whip, Dire:  The dire whip is a long coil of braided leather with a 3 pound iron ball at the end.  This is a reach weapon that strikes opponents 10 feet away.  Opponents who close within 10 feet take no damage from a dire whip.

Wrist Dart: This miniature crossbow mechanism is mounted on a sturdy forearm bracer, and fired by means of a wire that is looped around the character's index finger. Although smaller and weaker than a hand crossbow, it utilizes the same bolts, and has the advantage that it can still be used even if the character is holding something in that hand, such as a sword. You draw a wrist dart back by hand. Loading a wrist dart is a move-equivalent action that provokes attacks of opportunity. Your opponent cannot use a disarm action to disarm you of a wrist dart.

MASTERWORK WEAPONS

A masterwork weapon is a finely crafted version of a normal weapon. Wielding it provides a +1 enhancement bonus on attack rolls.

You can’t add the masterwork quality to a weapon after it is created; it must be crafted as a masterwork weapon (see the Craft skill). The masterwork quality adds 300 gp to the cost of a normal weapon (or 6 gp to the cost of a single unit of ammunition). Adding the masterwork quality to a double weapon costs twice the normal increase (+600 gp).

Masterwork ammunition is damaged (effectively destroyed) when used. The enhancement bonus of masterwork ammunition does not stack with any enhancement bonus of the projectile weapon firing it.

All magic weapons are automatically considered to be of masterwork quality. The enhancement bonus granted by the masterwork quality doesn’t stack with the enhancement bonus provided by the weapon’s magic.

Even though some types of armor and shields can be used as weapons, you can’t create a masterwork version of such an item that confers an enhancement bonus on attack rolls. Instead, masterwork armor and shields have lessened armor check penalties.

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